Blue Persimmons  -Fukushima after the nuclear disaster-

 このシリーズは破壊、分断された福島の土地と人を視覚的に表現し、放射能の被害とそれを許容する社会を捉えたたものである。 

 2011年、福島第一原発は水素爆発で放射性物質をまき散らした。多くの住民が避難し、今でも立ち入ることすらできない土地がある。私は、故郷の喪失と目には見えない放射能の被害を可視化するために、福島の風景を記録していった。

 事故から3年後、私は福島に移住し、居住者としての視点から福島を撮影することによりそこに存在する不条理に気づいた。福島では物理的だけでなく、精神的にも境界線が引かれ分断が起こっていたのだ。強制避難する区域とそうでない区域に境界線が引かれた。この境界線に従って避難の有無、賠償金の有無も別れ、その線は住民同士の心にも大きな境界線を引いてしまった。立場の違いによって、いままでの友人が心通わない人に変わった。誰も住んでいない区域から一歩境界線を越えると、何も変わらない普通の生活が営まれている。それはとても奇妙なことであると同時に、普通の生活を送っているように見える人たちの心には、分断における被害が刻まれていた。

 土地の分断、人々の分断、土地と人との分断。原発事故から7年の間に、物理的に土地に引かれた境界線は放射線量によって引き直され境界線は変化している。しかし人々の心の分断はもう元には戻らない。それでも、失われた故郷で人々は生き続けている。

This project shows the destroyed, divided living and land of Fukushima, and captures the damage of radiation with the society that tolerates it.

On 2011, Fukushima No.1 Nuclear Power plant exploded and scattered the radioactive material around this land. I have recorded the landscape to visualize the loss of the hometown and the damage caused by the invisible radiation.

Three years after the disaster, I moved to Fukushima. By having been photographing Fukushima as one of the local inhabitants, I became aware of the absurdity existing here. the boundary line was drawn both physically and mentally and 'Segmentation’ began. The border was run over the area forced to evacuate and the area which is not so by a certain distance from the Nuclear Plant. It is a big difference whether to evacuate or not by the border line. Due to the difference in position, friends of former times have changed to people who do not care. When I cross the line from a place where no one lives at all, there are people’s activities that seemingly does not change. That was odd, and even in the minds of those who seem to live a normal life, damage in segmentation was engraved.

The segmentation of lands, of people, of between land and people. In the seven years since the accident, the boundary line was redressed by radiation dose. However, the border drawn among people does not return to the original. Still, people live on their lost homeland.